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The 74 Amendments to the House Spending Bill That Got a Recorded Vote, Ranked

On Thursday, the House passed an omnibus spending bill for FY 2018. Before the August recess, the House passed a “minibus” spending bill that packaged together the Defense, Legislative Branch, Military Construction-Veterans Affairs, and Energy and Water Development bills. The so-called “Make America Secure and Prosperous Appropriations Act, 2018” consolidates the 8 remaining regular appropriations bills.

As you can probably guess, the bill is terrible.

Democratic Whip Steny Hoyer (MD-05) panned the spending bill: “H.R. 3354 not only constitutes an inadequate investment in both the domestic and international activities of government, but also a skewed reprioritization laid out within each of its eight divisions that would have devastating impacts throughout the economy.”

The bill especially hobbles the ability of the EPA to do its job: protect the environment. The bill, among other things, cuts $500 million from an already stretched EPA budget. In urging members to vote against the bill, a coalition of environmental groups explained, “This bill does not responsibly or adequately fund the federal government or the many programs and thousands of civil servants tasked with implementing our nation’s landmark environmental laws, laws that protect our health, air, climate, water, oceans, wildlife, and treasured American landscapes.”

Over the past two weeks, the House voted on a series of amendments to the spending bill. Many were passed or rejected by voice vote. However, 74 of them received recorded votes.

I did not, as the title implies, rank them. It would certainly have been interesting, although maddeningly time-consuming. However, I did organize them.

So here goes…

Overall Spending

As she always does, Marsha Blackburn (TN-07) offered an amendment to make 1% cuts across the board.

It failed 156 to 248.

Two Democrats — Jim Cooper (TN-05) and Filemon Vela (TX-34) — joined Republicans in voting for it, and 68 Republicans joined Democrats in voting against it.

Commerce

Manufacturing: Norma Torres (CA-35) offered an amendment to increase funding for the Manufacturing Extension Partnership program, a public-private partnership with Centers in all 50 states and Puerto Rico tasked with helping small and medium-sized manufacturers, by reducing administrative funds for the DOJ. (Commerce and Justice appropriations occur in the same bundle).

It passed 279 to 137. 189 Democrats and 90 Republicans voted for it. 136 Republicans and Democrat Cedric Richmond (LA-02) voted against it.

DC’s Autonomy

Budget Autonomy: Eleanor Holmes Norton (DC) offered an amendment to restore budget autonomy to the District by striking the repeal of the District of Columbia’s Local Budget Autonomy Amendment Act of 2012

It failed on a party line vote of 186 to 222.

Reproductive Rights: Gary Palmer (AL-06) offered an amendment to prohibit funds from being used to implement DC’s Reproductive Health Non-Discrimination Amendment Act, which makes it illegal for employers in the District to discriminate against workers based on their decision to use birth control, get an abortion, or make any other reproductive health decision.

It passed 214 to 194.

Two Democrats — Dan Lipinski (IL-03) and Collin Peterson (MN-07) — voted for it.

11 Republicans joined Democrats in voting against it: Mike Coffman (CO-06), Ryan Costello (PA-06), Carlos Curbelo (FL-06), Charlie Dent (PA-15), Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-08), John Katko (NY-24), Martha McSally (AZ-02), Pat Meehan (PA-07), Bruce Poliquin (ME-02), Tom Reed (NY-23), and Elise Stefanik (NY-21).

Education

21st Century Community Learning Centers: Nita Lowey (NY-17) offered an amendment to restore funding to the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program, which provides federal funding for academic, artistic, and cultural enrichment opportunities for students who attend high-poverty and low-performing schools — offset with Department of Education program administration funds.

It passed 228 to 188, with 39 Republicans joining Democrats in voting for it.

One Democrat — Don Beyer (VA-08) — voted against it. Beyer voted against a few Democratic amendments that make administrative cuts because his district is where a lot of those administrators call home.

Charters and Magnets: Joe Courtney (CT-02) offered an amendment to transfer $1.184 million from Charter School Grants to Magnet Schools Assistance.

It failed 204 to 212.

Four Democrats voted against it: Salud Carbajal (CA-24), Jim Cooper (TN-05), Stephen Lynch (MA-08), and Stephanie Murphy (FL-07).

19 Republicans voted for it: Ryan Costello (PA-06), Carlos Curbelo (FL-26), Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-08), Jaime Herrera Beutler (WA-03), Evan Jenkins (WV-03), John Katko (NY-24), Leonard Lance (NJ-07), Frank LoBiondo (NJ-02), Blaine Luetkemeyer (MO-03), Michael McCaul (TX-10), David McKinley (WV-01), Pete Olson (TX-22), Ted Poe (TX-02), Dave Reichert (WA-08), David Schweikert (AZ-06), Chris Smith (NJ-04), Lamar Smith (TX-21), Scott Tipton (CO-03), and Randy Weber (TX-14).

Cutting College Prep: Jason Lewis (MN-02) offered an amendment to transfer approximately $70 million from GEAR UP (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs) and TRiO, which provide college prep services for students from disadvantaged backgrounds, to Career and Technical Education (CTE) State Grants. Lewis, in touting his amendment, acts as though low-income students shouldn’t get the opportunity to go to college.

It failed 153 to 263.

149 Republicans voted for it, and 77 voted against it. Rod Blum (IA-01) voted present.

Four Democrats voted for it: Scott Peters (CA-52), Collin Peterson (MN-07), Bobby Rush (IL-01), and Filemon Vela (TX-34).

Cutting Education Spending: Glenn Grothman (WI-06) offered an amendment to reduce funding for the Department of Education’s Program Administration, Office of Inspector General, and Office of Student Aid Administration by 2%.

It failed 131 to 285, with 96 Republicans voting against it.

Environment

Alaskan National Preserve: Don Young (AK-AL) offered an amendment to prohibit funds to be used to implement a rule by the National Park Service that prohibited hunting wolf and coyote pups and adults in early summer when they den and their pelts have little commercial value; prohibited the taking of brown bears over bait; and prohibited the use of artificial light to take black bear cubs and sows with cubs at dens.

It passed 215 to 196.

Five Democrats joined Republicans in voting for it: Henry Cuellar (TX-28), Vicente Gonzalez (TX-15), Gene Green (TX-29), and Ron Kind (WI-03).

And 15 Republicans joined Democrats in voting against it: Ryan Costello (PA-06), Jeff Denham (CA-10), Dan Donovan (NY-11), Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-08), Pete King (NY-02), Leonard Lance (NJ-07), Frank LoBiondo (NJ-02), Tom MacArthur (NJ-03), Martha McSally (AZ-02), Pat Meehan (PA-07), Dave Reichert (WA-08), Ed Royce (CA-39), Chris Smith (NJ-04), Claudia Tenney (NY-22), and Fred Upton (MI-06).

Cutting EPA Funding: Ralph Norman (SC-05) offered an amendment to cut more than $1.8 billion from EPA appropriations.

It failed 151 to 260. One Democrat — Collin Peterson again — voted for it, but 75 Republicans voted against it.

Cutting EPA Funding (again): Andy Biggs (AZ-05) offered an amendment to cut more than $10 million from the EPA Environmental Programs and Management Account.

It failed 184 to 228, with 42 Republicans joining Democrats in voting it down.

Environmental Justice: Raul Grijalva (AZ-03) offered an amendment to restore funding for the Environmental Justice Program within the EPA Environmental Programs and Management account with an equivalent cut to Leadership and Administration within the DOI Office of the Secretary.

It failed 190 to 218.

9 Republicans joined Democrats in voting for it: Ryan Costello (PA-06), Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-08), Walter Jones (NC-03), Leonard Lance (NJ-07), Frank LoBiondo (NJ-02), Martha McSally (AZ-02), Pat Meehan (PA-07), Erik Paulsen (MN-03), and Chris Smith (NJ-04).

5 Democrats joined Republicans in voting against it: Brendan Boyle (PA-13), Alcee Hastings (FL-20), Collin Peterson (MN-07), Kurt Schrader (OR-05), and Jose Serrano (NY-15).

EPA → Mine Reclamation: Glenn Thompson (PA-05) offered an amendment transfer more than $32 million from the EPA’s program budget to the Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation pilot program.

It narrowly passed 207 to 205.

29 Republicans voted against it, but Thompson’s amendment picked up support from 9 Democrats: Brendan Boyle (PA-13), Bob Brady (PA-01), Matt Cartwright (PA-17), Henry Cuellar (TX-27), Pete DeFazio (OR-04), Mike Doyle (PA-14), John Larson (CT-01), Collin Peterson (MN-07), and Tim Ryan (OH-13).

Gold King Mine Spill: Ben Lujan (NM-03) offered an amendment to reallocate $6 million within State and Tribal Assistance Grants to direct the EPA to work with the affected States and Indian tribes to implement a long-term monitoring program for water quality of the Animas and San Juan Rivers in response to the Gold King Mine spill.

It passed 220 to 191, with 35 Republicans joining Democrats in voting for it.

Methane: Markwayne Mullin (OK-02) offered an amendment to prohibit the use of funds for enforcing the Obama Administration’s methane rule, which aimed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and other pollution stemming from methods of fossil fuel extraction like fracking .

It passed 218 to 205.

Three Democrats voted for it: Henry Cuellar (TX-28), Vicente Gonzalez (TX-15), and Collin Peterson (MN-07)

11 Republicans voted against it: Ryan Costello (PA-06), John Faso (NY-19), Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-08), John Katko (NY-24), Steve Knight (CA-25), Brian Mast (FL-18), Pat Meehan (PA-07), Dave Reichert (WA-08), Mark Sanford (SC-01), Chris Smith (NJ-04), and Elise Stefanik (NY-21).

Methane Leaks: Steve Pearce (NM-02) offered an amendment to prevent funds from being used to implement the Bureau of Land Management’s rule (issued under Obama) to require owners and operators of both new and existing federal oil and gas leases to implement comprehensive methane leak detection and repair (LDAR) programs throughout the whole process.

It passed 216 to 186.

Two Democrats voted for it: Sanford Bishop (GA-02) and Stephen Lynch (MA-08).

Eight Republicans voted against it: Ryan Costello (PA-06), John Faso (NY-19), Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-08), John Katko (NY-24), Brian Mast (FL-18), Dave Reichert (WA-08), Mark Sanford (SC-01), and Elise Stefanik (N-21).

Oceans: Bill Flores (TX-17) offered an amendment to prohibit the use of funds to implement, administer, or enforce Obama’s executive order establishing a national policy on marine stewardship.

It failed 216 to 199.

Two Democrats — Collin Peterson (MN-07) and Frederica Wilson (FL-24) — voted for it, and 11 Republicans voted against it.

Here are the 11: Vern Buchanan (FL-16), James Comer (KY-01), Ryan Costello (PA-06), Carlos Curbelo (FL-26), Rodney Davis (IL-13), Dan Donovan (NY-11), Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-08), Jeff Fortenberry (NE-01), Brian Mast (FL-18), Bruce Poliquin (ME-02), and Elise Stefanik (NY-21).

Oceans (redux): Alan Lowenthal (CA-47) offered an amendment to strike a provision relating to the use of the National Ocean Policy.

It failed 189 to 220.

One Democrat — Collin Peterson (MN-07) — joined Republicans in voting against it.

And six Republicans joined Democrats in voting for it: Ryan Costello (PA-06), Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-08), Jeff Fortenberry (NE-01), Brian Mast (FL-18), Bruce Poliquin (ME-02), and Elise Stefanik (NY-21).

Ozone Standards: Keith Ellison (MN-05) offered an amendment to strike the language that would delay the implementation of the new Ozone Standards.

It failed 194 to 218.

Three Democrats joined Republicans in voting against it: Henry Cuellar (TX-28), Gregory Meeks (NY-05), and Collin Peterson (MN-07).

And 11 Republicans joined Democrats in voting for it: John Faso (NY-19), Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-08), Leonard Lance (NJ-07), Frank LoBiondo (NJ-02), Tom MacArthur (NJ-03), Brian Mast (FL-18), Bruce Poliquin (ME-02), Dave Reichert (WA-08), Mark Sanford (SC-01), Chris Smith (NJ-04), and Elise Stefanik (NY-21).

Polluting the Chesapeake: Bob Goodlatte (VA-08) offered an amendment to prevent the EPA from enforcing a rule designed to clean water to the Chesapeake. Bay and the region’s streams, cleans, and rivers.

It passed 214 to 197.

One Democrat — Collin Peterson (MN-07) — joined Republicans in voting for it.

13 Republicans joined Democrats in voting against it: Barbara Comstock (VA-10), John Faso (NY-19), Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-08), Andy Harris (MD-01), David Joyce (OH-14), Leonard Lance (NJ-07), Frank LoBiondo (NJ-02), Tom MacArthur (NJ-03), Pat Meehan (PA-07), Erik Paulsen (MN-03), Chris Smith (NJ-04), Scott Taylor (VA-03), and Rob Wittman (VA-01).

Preventing Office Closure: Jared Polis (CO-02) offered an amendment to prohibit funds from being used to support the closure or consolidation of any regional office of the EPA.

It failed 201 to 212.

Three Democrats voted against it: Scott Peters (CA-52), Collin Peterson (MN-07), and Kurt Schrader (OR-05).

And 17 Republicans voted for it: Michael Conaway (TX-11), Ryan Costello (PA-06), Charlie Dent (PA-15), Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-08), Jeff Fortenberry (NE-01), Leonard Lance (NJ-07), Frank LoBiondo (NJ-02), Tom MacArthur (NJ-03), Brian Mast (FL-18), Pat Meehan (PA-07), Bruce Poliquin (ME-02), Mark Sanford (SC-01), Chris Smith (NJ-04), Elise Stefanik (NY-19), Steve Stivers (OH-15), Scott Tipton (CO-03), and Fred Upton (MI-06).

Preventing Offshore Drilling: Salud Carbajal (CA-24) offered an amendment to prohibit the use of funds to process any permit that would allow for the use of hydraulic fracturing or acid well stimulation treatment in the Pacific Outer Continental Shelf.

It failed 177 to 230.

Four Republicans voted for it: Ryan Costello (PA-06), Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-08), Brian Mast (FL-18), and Mark Sanford (SC-01).

Ten Democrats voted against it: Sanford Bishop (GA-02), Jim Cooper (TN-05), Henry Cuellar (TX-28), Vicente Gonzalez (TX-15), Al Green (TX-09), Gene Green (TX-29), Sheila Jackson Lee (TX-18), Collin Peterson (MN-07), and Kyrsten Sinema (AZ-09), and Filemon Vela (TX-34).

Protecting Polluters: Gary Palmer (AL-06) offered an amendment to block any funds from going to the EPA’s Criminal Enforcement Division.

It failed 178 to 227.

One Democrat — Filemon Vela (TX-34) — voted for it, and 45 Republicans voted against it.

Protecting Public Lands: Jared Polis (CO-02) offered an amendment to prohibit the use of funds to pursue any extra-legal ways to transfer Federal lands to private owners in contravention of existing law.

It failed 198 to 212. One Democrat — Collin Peterson (MN-07)— voted against it. And 13 Republicans voted for it.

Here are the 13: Susan Brooks (IN-05), Ryan Costello (PA-06), Neal Dunn (FL-02), Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-08), Jeff Fortenberry (NE-01), Greg Gianforte (MT-AL), Walter Jones (NC-03), John Katko (NY-24), Leonard Lance (NJ-07), Pat Meehan (PA-07), Mike Simpson (ID-02), Elise Stefanik (NY-19), and Scott Tipton (CO-03).

Social Cost of Carbon: Markwayne Mullin (OK-02) offered an amendment to prohibit funds for implementing the Obama Administration’s Social Cost of Carbon rule, which allowed for more environmentally sustainable planning and permitting.

It passed 225 to 186.

Four Democrats voted for it : Henry Cuellar (TX-28), Vicente Gonzalez (TX-15), Gene Green (TX-29), and Collin Peterson (MN-07).

Five Republicans voted against it: Jack Bergman (MI-01), Ryan Costello (PA-06), John Faso (NY-19), Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-08), and Elise Stefanik (NY-21).

Superfunds: Raul Grijalva (AZ-03) offered an amendment to restore funding for the Superfund program, which cleans up sites contaminated with hazardous substances, by taking money from the oil and gas program within the BLM account.

It failed 191 to 221.

Nine Republicans joined Democrats in voting for it: Ryan Costello (PA-06), Dan Donovan (NY-11), Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-08), John Faso (NY-19), Walter Jones (NC-03), Pete King (NY-02), Leonard Lance (NJ-07), Frank LoBiondo (NJ-02), and Chris Smith (NJ-04).

Four Democrats joined Republians in voting against it: Ami Bera (CA-07), Henry Cuellar (TX-28), Michelle Lujan Grisham (NM-01), and Collin Peterson (MN-07).

Financial Services

Conflict Mineral Complicity: Bill Huizenga (MI-02) offered an amendment to prohibit the use of funds to implement, administer, or enforce the SEC rule, initiated by Dodd-Frank, that requires companies using gold, tin, tungsten, and tantalum to perform due diligence to make sure that their purchases are not funding armed groups in the Democratic Republic of Congo (and to publicly report upon such due diligence).

It passed 211 to 195.

Ten Republicans joined Democrats in voting against it: Ryan Costello (PA-06), Carlos Curbelo (FL-26), Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-08), Jeff Fortenberry (NE-01), Walter Jones (NC-03), Leonard Lance (NJ-07), Frank LoBiondo (NJ-02), Tom MacArthur (NJ-03), Ed Royce (CA-39), and Chris Smith (NJ-04).

Cutting the IRS budget: Louie Gohmert (TX-01) offered an amendment to cut $165,300 from the IRS’s Operations budget.

It failed 186 to 223, with 37 Republicans voting against it.

Cutting the IRS, SEC, etc., etc. budgets.: Paul Mitchell (MI-10) offered an amendment to cut the budget for general administrative and departmental salaries and expense accounts for the IRS, SEC, and related agencies by 10%.

It failed 166 to 241, with 56 Republicans joining the Democrats to vote it down.

Fighting Identity Theft: Sheila Jackson Lee (TX-18) offered an amendment to provide additional funding to the Taxpayer Advocate Service for the purpose of assisting the parents of a deceased child, when that child’s information has been stolen and used on personal income taxes filed with the IRS, when the parent or guardian of record must report the identity theft of their deceased child’s information.

It passed 265 to 143. 183 Democrats and 82 Republicans voted for it. 140 Republicans and 3 Democrats voted against it.

The 3 Democrats were Steny Hoyer (MD-05), Rick Larsen (WA-02), and Kyrsten Sinema (AZ-09).

Protecting Mobile Home Owners: Keith Ellison (MN-05) offered an amendment to strike the language in the bill related to the deceptively titled Preserving Access to Manufactured Housing Act, a bill passed by the House in 2015 that would lead to higher mortgages for mobile home owners.

Here was American for Financial Reform’s take on the bill back then:

H.R. 650, the Preserving Access to Manufactured Housing Act of 2015, would make homeownership more costly for those who can least afford it. It would do this by raising the interest rate and points and fees trigger for protections under the high-cost mortgage protections of HOEPA for manufactured housing loans. This bill would not expand access to sustainable credit, but would strip away protections already created by Congress and implemented by the CFPB. If this bill became law it would permit an interest rate of close to 14% in today’s market for a 15- or 20-year loan on a family’s home mortgage without enhanced protections. In comparison, the going rate for traditional real-estate mortgages is currently around 4%.

It failed 163 to 245. One Republican — Walter Jones (NC-03 — voted for it, and 23 Democrats voted against it.

Here are the 23 Democrats: Peter Aguilar (CA-31), Salud Carbajal (CA-24), Jim Cooper (TN-05), Lou Correa (CA-46), Pete DeFazio (OR-04), John Delaney (MD-06), Josh Gottheimer (NJ-05), Ruben Kihuen (NV-04), Ron Kind (WI-03), Seth Moulton (MA-06), Stephanie Murphy (FL-07), Tom O’Halleran (AZ-01), Jimmy Panetta (CA-20), Ed Perlmutter (CO-07),
Scott Peters (CA-52), Kathleen Rice (NY-04), Jacky Rosen (NV-03), Brad Schneider (IL-10), David Scott (GA-13), Terri Sewell (AL-07), Brad Sherman (CA-30), Kyrsten Sinema (AZ-09), and Tom Suozzi (NY-03).

Protecting the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau: Keith Ellison (MN-05) offered an amendment to strike section of the bill that would subject the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to the regular appropriations process (something Republicans want to do in order to make it easier to cut and politicize the agency).

It failed 183 to 226.

Two Republicans — Walter Jones (NC-03) and Bruce Poliquin (ME-02) — voted for it.

Five Democrats voted against it: Jim Cooper (TN-05), Henry Cuellar (TX-28), Alcee Hastings (FL-20), Stephanie Murphy (FL-07), and Scott Peters (CA-52).

Taking on Payday Lenders: Keith Ellison (MN-05) offered an amendment to strike the section of the bill prohibiting the CFPB from issuing or enforcing any rule with respect to payday loans, vehicle title loans, or other similar loans.

It failed 186 to 221.

Four Republicans voted for it: Mike Coffman (CO-06), Glenn Grothman (WI-06), Walter Jones (NC-03), and Bruce Poliquin (ME-02).

And three Democrats voted against it: Henry Cuellar (TX-28), Alcee Hastings (FL-20), and Collin Peterson (MN-07).

Foreign Operations/State

Cutting Economic Aid: Glenn Grothman (WI-06) offered an amendment to reduce the amount appropriated for the Economic Support Fund, which is used to promote economic stability in places where the US has a strategic interest, by $12 million.

It failed 105 to 307, with 121 Republicans joining Democrats in voting against it.

Defunding Human Rights: Ted Yoho (FL-03) offered an amendment to end US contributions to the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC), the United Nations Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), and the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA).

It failed 199 to 212.

Three Democrats — Josh Gottheimer (NJ-05), Kyrsten Sinema (AZ-09), and Tom Suozzi (NY-03) — joined Republicans in voting for it, but 29 Republicans defected and voted against it.

Int’l Education → Int’l War on Drugs: Keith Rothfus (PA-12) offered an amendment to transfer $30 million to the International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement account from the Fulbright Program.

It failed 163 to 248, with 62 Republicans voting against it.

Internationalism → Imperialism : Austin Scott (GA-08) offered an amendment cut $10 million from the appropriations for International Organizations and transfer it to Western Hemisphere Regional Cooperation. (The US is a notorious bad actor in the Western Hemisphere, routinely supporting right-wing factions and militarizing police forces throughout Latin America).

It passed 217 to 193.

Four Democrats voted for it: Adriano Espaillat (NY-13), Josh Gottheimer (NJ-05), Kurt Schrader (OR-05), and Filemon Vela (TX-34).

And 11 Republicans voted against it: Justin Amash (MI-03), Charlie Dent (PA-15), Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-08), Jeff Fortenberry (NE-01), Rodney Frelinghuysen (NJ-11), Evan Jenkins (WV-03), Billy Long (MS-07), Tom MacArthur (NJ-03), Erik Paulsen (MN-03), Tom Rooney (FL-17), and David Schweikert (AZ-06).

Health & Human Services

Assisted Outpatient Treatment: Tim Murphy (PA-18) offered an amendment to increase funding for court-ordered Assisted Outpatient Treatment by $5 million. AOT refers to court-ordered psychiatric treatment in which the individual still lives in the community rather than being incarcerated or institutionalized.

It failed 198 to 219. 131 Republicans and 68 Democrats voted for it, and 123 Democrats and 96 Republicans voted against it. There were strange bedfellows coalitions on both sides, likely a result of the contentious debate around AOT.

Infant Mortality: Dan Kildee (MI-05) offered an amendment to increase funding for the Healthy Start Program, which develops community-based systems approaches to reduce infant mortality in high-risk communities, by $24.8 million and decrease General Departmental Management in the Office of the Secretary by the same amount.

It passed 243 to 175, with 53 Republicans joining Democrats in voting for it.

Mental Health: Katherine Clark (MA-05) offered an amendment to restore funding to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)’s mental health programs, offset with HHS program administration funds.

It passed 225 to 192.

38 Republicans joined Democrats in voting for it, but 3 Democrats — Don Beyer (VA-08), Steny Hoyer (MD-05), and Brad Schneider (IL-10) — voted against it. Hoyer and Beyer likely have a lot of administrators as constituents.

Mixing Drugs: Buddy Carter (GA-01) offered an amendment to prevent the FDA from enforcing a new rule on drug compounding.

It failed 141 to 279. 136 Republicans and 5 Democrats voted for it, and 183 Democrats and 96 Republicans voted against it.

The 5 Democrats were Sanford Bishop (GA-02), Henry Cuellar (TX-28), Mark Pocan (WI-02), Jared Polis (CO-02), and Dutch Ruppersberger (MD-02).

Peer Support: Ben Lujan (NM-03) offered an amendment to decrease funding for HHS General Departmental Management by $2 million and transfer those funds to the Peer Support Programs.

It passed 213 to 205, as 20 Republicans joined Democrats in voting for it.

“Homeland Security”

Banning Private Prisons: Joaquin Castro (TX-20) also offered an amendment to prohibit the use of privatized immigration detention facilities.

It failed 183 to 230, with three Democrats voting against it. The three were Henry Cuellar (TX-28), Al Lawson (FL-05), and Collin Peterson (MN-07).

Banning Prison Expansion: Pramila Jayapal (WA-07) offered an amendment to prohibit funding from being used to expand or build new detention facilities.

It failed 180 to 230, with five Democrats voting against it.

The five were Henry Cuellar (TX-28), Dan Lipinski (IL-03), Scott Peters (CA-52), Collin Peterson (MN-07), and Kyrsten Sinema (AZ-09).

Body Cameras for the Border Police: Joaquin Castro (TX-20) offered an amendment to increase funding for the Customs and Border Protection’s body camera program.

It failed narrowly 205 to 207.

20 Republicans joined Democrats in voting for it: Joe Barton (TX-06), Larry Bucshon (IN-08), Michael Burgess (TX-26), Mike Coffman (CO-06), Ryan Costello (PA-06), Neal Dunn (FL-02), Blake Farenthold (TX-27), Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-08), Jaime Herrera Beutler (WA-03), John Katko (NY-24), Leonard Lance (NJ-07), Jason Lewis (MN-02), Frank LoBiondo (NJ-02), Tom MacArthur (NJ-03), Pat Meehan (PA-07), Ted Poe (TX-02), Tom Reed (NY-23), Chris Smith (NJ-04), Fred Upton (MI-06), and Rob Woodall (GA-06).

Body Cameras for ICE: Castro also offered an amendment to increase funding for ICE to incorporate body-worn cameras.

It failed 203 to 211.

One Democrat — Collin Peterson (MN-07) — voted against it, and 17 Republicans voted for it.

Here are the 17: Joe Barton (TX-06), Mike Coffman (CO-06), Ryan Costello (PA-06), Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-08), Drew Ferguson (GA-03), Jaime Herrera Beutler (WA-03), John Katko (NY-24), Leonard Lance (NJ-07), Frank LoBiondo (NJ-02), Tom MacArthur (NJ-03), Pat Meehan (PA-07), Ralph Norman (SC-05), Ted Poe (TX-02), Tom Reed (NY-23), David Schweikert (AZ-06), Chris Smith (NJ-04), and Rob Woodall (GA-06).

Defunding Sanctuary Cities: Jason Smith (MO-08) offered an amendment to block funds from going to any state or municipality that decides not to be fully complicit in Trump’s mass deportation agenda (i.e., they choose not to collect and pass along citizenship information).

It passed 225 to 195. One Democrat — Henry Cuellar (TX-28) — voted for it, and eight Republicans voted against it.

Here are the eight: Dan Donovan (NY-11), Pete King (NY-02), Frank LoBiondo (NJ-02), Dave Reichert (WA-08), Scott Taylor (VA-02), Pat Tiberi (OH-12), David Valadao (CA-21), and Greg Walden (OR-02).

ICE → Ice: Lucille Royball-Allard (CA-40) offered an amendment to take $849.5 million from ICE’s enforcement budget and use it for polar icebreakers for the Coast Guard.

It failed 170 to 241.

One Republican — Don Young (AK) — voted for it, and 15 Democrats joined the GOP in voting it down.

Here are the 15: Ami Bera (CA-07), Cheri Bustos (IL-17), Kathy Castor (FL-14), Jim Cooper (TN-05), Brian Higgins (NY-26), Dan Lipinski (IL-03), David Loebsack (IA-02), Stephen Lynch (MA-08), Sean Maloney (NY-18), Tom O’Halleran (AZ-01), Scott Peters (CA-52), Collin Peterson (MN-07), Raul Ruiz (CA-36), Kyrsten Sinema (AZ-09), and Tom Suozzi (NY-18).

ICE → Cutter: Lou Correa (CA-46) offered an amendment to reduce ICE’s enforcement budget by $100 million and transfer it to Coast Guard’s budget for Cutter ships for drug interdiction.

It failed 182 to 229, with five Democrats joining the GOP against it.

The five Democrats were Henry Cuellar (TX-28), Stephen Lynch (MA-08), Jerry McNerney (CA-09), Bobby Scott (VA-03), and Filemon Vela (TX-34).

Purchasing Unnecessary Ships: Duncan Hunter offered an amendment to transfer $5 million dollars from the Coast Guard’s Operations Expenses to its Research, Development, Test and Evaluation Account, for the purpose of supporting Coast Guard Icebreaker sea trials. Hunter has been pushing the Coast Guard to purchase an icebreaker vessel manufactured by a campaign donor even though the Coast Guard doesn’t want it.

It passed 245 to 168.

30 Democrats voted for it: Pete Aguilar (CA-31), Ami Bera (CA-07), Don Beyer (VA-08), Julia Brownley (CA-26), Yvette Clarke (NY-09), Steve Cohen (TN-09), Gerry Connolly (VA-11), Lou Correa (CA-46), Joe Courtney (CT-02), Suzan DelBene (WA-01), Eliot Engel (NY-16), Tulsi Gabbard (HI-02), Ruben Gallego (AZ-07), Josh Gottheimer (NJ-05), Hakeem Jeffries (NY-08), Hank Johnson (GA-04), Ron Kind (WI-03), Don McEachin (VA-04), Jerry McNerney (CA-09), Gregory Meeks (NY-05), Stephanie Murphy (FL-07), Donald Payne (NJ-10), Ed Perlmutter (CO-07), Scott Peters (CA-52), Cedric Richmond (LA-02), Bobby Scott (VA-03), Brad Sherman (CA-30), Kyrsten Sinema (AZ-09), Adam Smith (WA-09), and Tom Suozzi (NY-03).

10 Republicans voted against it: Justin Amash (MI-03), Mo Brooks (AL-05), Ted Budd (NC-13), Warren Davidson (OH-08), Bob Goodlatte (VA-06), Trey Hollingsworth IN-09), Mike Johnson (LA-04), Raul Labrador (ID-01), Billy Long (MO-07), John Rutherford (FL-04), Mike Rogers (AL-03), and Francis Rooney (FL-19).

Housing & Urban Development

Cutting HUD Funding: Glenn Grothman (WI-06) offered an amendment to reduce the funding level for the Department of Housing and Urban Development by two percent.

It failed 140 to 280, with 92 Republicans voting against it.

Cutting Rental Assistance: Grothman also offered an amendment to decrease the funding for the Public and Indian Housing Tenant-Based Rental Assistance Program by $177,362,500, excluding veterans, elderly, and the disabled.

It failed 124 to 295, with 108 Republicans voting against it.

Cutting Rental Assistance (take two): Grothman also offered an amendment to decrease funding for the Project-Based Rental Assistance Housing Program by $266,000,000.

His second amendment likewise failed 139 to 282, with 94 Republicans voting against it.

NeighborWorks America: Jacky Rosen (NV-03) offered an amendment to increase funding for the Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation (NeighborWorks America) by $35M, bringing total NeighborWorks appropriations to the same level as FY16. NeighborWorks America provides funding for community development organizations.

It failed 200 to 220. 4 Democrats — Don Beyer (VA-08), Gerry Connolly (VA-11), Eliot Engel (NY-16), and Dwight Evans (PA-02) — voted against it.

16 Republicans voted for it: Justin Amash (MI-03), Kevin Brady (TX-08), Ryan Costello (PA-06), Charlie Dent (PA-15), Jeff Fortenberry (NE-01), Evan Jenkins (WV-03), Frank LoBiondo (NJ-02), Roger Marshall (KS-01), David McKinley (WV-01), Pat Meehan (PA-07), Alex Mooney (WV-02), Tim Murphy (PA-18), Tom Reed (NY-23), Chris Smith (NJ-04), Roger Williams (TX-25), and Lee Zeldin (NY-01).

Labor

Collecting Data for Pay Equity: Bobby Scott (VA-03) offered an amendment to strike the section prohibiting the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) from using funds to implement pay data collection.

It failed 192 to 223.

Three Republicans joined Democrats in voting for it: Mike Bost (IL-12), Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-08), and Michael Turner (OH-10).

Cutting DOL & HHS: Marsha Blackburn (TN-07): to provide for a 1% across the board cut to the appropriations for the Department of Labor, the Department of Health and Human Services, and related agencies.

It failed 156 to 260, with 70 Republicans joining the Democrats in voting against it.

Cutting NLRB Funding: Glenn Grothman (WI-06) offered an amendment to reduce the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) budget by $99 million (a budget cut of about 40%).

It failed 175 to 241, with 52 Republicans voting against it.

Lowering Wages on Federal Projects (x 3): Steve King (IA-04) offered several amendments to block the use of funds for implementing, administering, or enforcing the Davis-Bacon Act, which requires the government to pay at least the local prevailing wage on public works projects.

The first failed 176 to 241, with 54 Republicans joining Democrats to vote against it. King offered similar amendments later on as well, which failed 180 to 241 and 173 to 240 (with the difference largely a function of absences).

Make Mines (Even More) Unsafe Again: Mark Meadows (NC-11) offered an amendment to reduce the number of positions and funding at Mine Safety and Health Administration by 10%.

It failed 178 to 238. One Democrat — Kyrsten Sinema (AZ-09) — voted for it, and 49 Republicans voted against it. Bill Huizenga (MI-02) voted present.

Make Workplaces (Even More) Unsafe Again: Bob Gibbs (OH-07) offered an amendment to prohibit funds to implement, administer, or enforce the Occupational Safety and Hazard Administration (OSHA) rule that requires certain employers to electronically submit injury and illness data they already record, making it available to the public. The rule took effect on January 1st of this year.

It passed 215 to 201.

One Democrat — Collin Peterson (MN-07) — voted for it, and 13 Republicans voted against it.

Here are the 13: Rod Blum (IA-01), John Culberson (TX-07), Dan Donovan (NY-11), John Faso (NY-19), Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-08), Walter Jones (NC-03), John Katko (NY-24), Leonard Lance (NJ-07), Frank LoBiondo (NJ-02), Tom MacArthur (NJ-03), Tom Rooney (FL-17), Chris Smith (NJ-04), and Don Young (AK-AL).

Not Contracting with Corporate Criminals: Keith Ellison (MN-05) offered an amendment to prohibit funds from going federal contracts with willful or repeated violators of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

It failed 191 to 226.

Three Republicans voted for it — Don Bacon (NE-02), Jimmy Duncan (TN-02), and Tom Emmer (MN-06) — and two Democrats voted against it: Salud Carbajal (CA-24) and Vicente Gonzalez (TX-15).

Slowing Down Union Elections: Tim Walberg (MI-03) offered to prevent the use of funds to implement of a rule from the National Labor Relations Board that speeds up union elections by allowing employees to take a vote on union representation as soon as 11 days after a petition for representation is filed.

It passed 221 to 196. One Democrat — Henry Cuellar (TX-28) — voted for it, and 7 Republicans voted against it: Dan Donovan (NY-11), Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-08), Pete King (NY-02), Frank LoBiondo (NJ-02), Tom MacArthur (NJ-03), Chris Smith (NJ-04), and Don Young (AK).

Women’s Bureau: Grace Meng (NY-06) offered an amendment to increase funding for the Women’s Bureau within the Department of Labor by $1.064 million, and decrease funding by the same amount for the Bureau of Labor Statistics Prices and Cost of Living Division.

It passed 220 to 198, with 30 Republicans joining Democrats in voting for it.

Worker Protection: Mark Pocan (WI-02) offered an amendment to restore funding to worker protection agencies, offset with DOL/HHS/ED program administration funds.

It failed 199 to 219.

One Democrat — Don Beyer (VA-08) — voted against it. (Beyer represents Northern Virginia, where the administrators in question probably live.)

10 Republicans voted for it: Justin Amash (MI-03), Rod Blum (IA-01), Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-08), Walter Jones (NC-03), John Katko (NY-24), Pete King (NY-02), Leonard Lance (NJ-07), Frank LoBiondo (NJ-02), Chris Smith (NJ-04), and Don Young (AK-AL).

Youth Employment: Dan Kildee (MI-05) offered an amendment to increase funding for Youth Employment Activities by reallocating $10 million from the DOL Salaries and Expenses account.

It passed 247 to 170, with 57 Republicans joining Democrats in voting for it.

Justice

Cutting ATFE: Glenn Grothman (WI-06) offered an amendment to reduce the funding level for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives by five percent.

It failed 98 to 313.

95 Republicans and 3 Democrats — Vicente Gonzalez (TX-15), Tom O’Halleran (AZ-01), and Jared Polis (CO-02) — voted for it. 127 Republicans and 186 Democrats voted against it.

Preventing Exploitation in Halfway Houses: Eleanor Holmes Norton (DC-AL) offered an amendment to prohibit the Federal Bureau of Prisons from requiring individuals in halfway houses or on home confinement to pay a subsistence fee.

It failed 189 to 225, with 3 crossovers each way.

Justin Amash (MI-03), Matt Gaetz (FL-01), and Tom Rooney (FL-17) voted for it with the Democrats.

Ami Bera (CA-07), Ed Perlmutter (CO-07), and Kurt Schrader (OR-05) voted against it with the Republicans.

Promoting Trump’s Immigration Agenda: Ken Buck (CO-04) offered an amendment to require that localities receiving funds from the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP) funds, which reimburses state and local governments for the costs of incarcerating unauthorized immigrants, comply with federal immigration law. In other words, an attempt to block funds from “sanctuary cities.”

It passed 226 to 191.

Four Democrats voted for it: Matt Cartwright (PA-17), Henry Cuellar (TX-28), Stephen Lynch (MA-08), and Collin Peterson (MN-07).

Six Republicans voted against it: Carlos Curbelo (FL-26), Dan Donovan (NY-11), Pete King (NY-02), Raul Labrador (ID-01), Frank LoBiondo (NJ-02), and Dave Reichert (WA-08).

Transportation

Cutting Amtrak Funding: Ted Budd (NC-13) offered an amendment to eliminate a $900 million allocation for the upgrade of an Amtrak rail line between Newark and New York City by increasing funding for national New Starts Projects by $400 million and applying savings from the elimination of the TIGER Grant program to deficit reduction.

It failed 159 to 260. 155 Republicans and 4 Democrats voted for it, and 184 Democrats and 76 Republicans voted against it.

The 4 Democrats were Ruben Gallego (AZ-07), Tom O’Halleran (AZ-01), Kyrsten Sinema (AZ-09), and Adam Smith (WA-09).

Cutting Essential Air Service: Tom McClintock (CA-04) offered an amendment to reduce funding for the Essential Air Service program by $150 million. The EAS was enacted to guarantee that small communities maintain commercial service.

It failed 140 to 280. 136 Republicans and 4 Democrats voted for it, and 184 Democrats and 96 Republicans voted against it.

The 4 Democrats were Kathy Castor (FL-14), Jim Cooper (TN-05), Jim Himes (CT-04), and Jared Polis (CO-02).

Defunding Amtrak: Mo Brooks (AL-05) offered an amendment to defund Amtrak.

It failed 128 to 293, with 105 Republicans joining Democrats in voting it down.

Make Trucking (Even More) Unsafe Again: Brian Babin (TX-36) offered an amendment to prohibit funds from being used to implement or enforce the Electronic Logging Device (ELD) mandate. This mandate stems from a 2012 bill and aims to ensure that truck drivers are not being forced to work for more continuous hours than legally allowed. The ELDs would replace a paper logbook.

It failed 173 to 246. Eight Democrats voted for it, and 67 Republicans voted against it.

Here are the eight Democrats: John Garamendi (CA-03), Gene Green (TX-29), Ron Kind (WI-03), Rick Nolan (MN-08), Collin Peterson (MN-07), Jared Polis (CO-02), Filemon Vela (TX-34), and Tim Walz (MN-01).




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